Tennessee

Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel – Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus

  • Status – Federally Endangered
  • Estimated numbers – Unknown. But more than 1,000 individuals have been discovered in North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia since 1985. There are 25 subspecies currently recognized. The Carolina northern remains one of the rarest mammals in the southern United States
  • Population trend – Unknown
  • Location – North Carolina, east Tennessee, and southwest Virginia
  • Why are they under threat – Because of habitat destruction, fragmentation, or alteration associated with clearing of forests, introduced pest species such as the balsam woolly adelgid, mineral extraction, recreational development, pollution and global warming. Declines may also be due to an increase in a roundworm parasite of the southern flying squirrels, which is lethal or debilitating to the northern flying squirrels.
  • What can you do – Volunteer to build and check flying squirrel boxes, you can also vote on legislation, and send a letter of support or opposition to your representative here.
  • Species foundation – There doesn’t appear to be a specific species trust as the species is not endangered outside of this sub species, but you can support the Tennessee Wildlife Federation to protect all local wildlife.

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

 

photo credit – @emilwalker

© Louis Masai 2016