Michigan

Gray Wolf

  • Status – Endangered
  • estimated numbers – There are an estimated 7,000 to 11,200 gray wolves in Alaska, 3,700 in the Great Lakes region and 1,675 in the Northern Rockies.
  • population trend – Increasing
  • location – Gray wolves were once common throughout North America, but were exterminated in most areas of the United States by the mid 1930s. Today, their range has been reduced to Canada, Alaska, the Great Lakes, the Northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest. Thanks to the reintroduction of wolves in 1995, Yellowstone National Park is one of the best places to see and hear wolves in their native habitat.
  • why are they under threat – Conflict with Humans. Where wolves are protected under the Endangered Species Act, the most common cause of death is conflict with people over livestock loss. While wolf predation on livestock is fairly uncommon, wolves suspected of preying on livestock are often killed. Where they are not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act, the most common cause of death for wolves is hunting and trapping.
  • what can you do – Adopt a Gray Wolf here. A symbolic adoption helps save real animals in the wild. Take Action, visit the Wildlife Action Center to send a message to government leaders.
  • Species foundation – www.defenders.org

photo – tee byford

photo – louis masai

photo – tee byford

photo – tee byford

photo – tee byford

photo – louis masai

photo – louis masai

photo – tee byford

photo – louis masai

© Louis Masai 2016